Reasons to visit The Yukon this Summer

The Yukon is possibly one of the most underrated provinces to travel to during the summer, here’s why you should make it a top priority on your Canadian adventure.

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The wildlife
Bison roaming along the highway, herds of them, so many you will have to stop the car to let them past and capture a photograph. Black bears and moose can be seen along the calm roads, no need to leave the car if you don’t want to. There are fishing spots to take respite from driving and spot beavers swimming in the water, maybe even plunge in yourself to cool off in the summer humidity.

Learn about First Nations
In most provinces First Nations feel like an after thought in post-colonial Canada, the Yukon does not follow suit. Natives account for a quarter of the Yukon population, and compared that to the national population percentage of 4.3% that is a significant increase. The Yukon gives much more control and consideration to the Aboriginal population and runs a Self-Government system. Learning about the rich history of tribes and being amazed at the intricate art work can be done in one of the many museums, galleries and learning centres.  It is a chance to buy real native art and clothing, knowing that your purchase will make a difference in their community, rather than funding large corporations.

The Scenery
The Yukon’s official flower is Fireweed, as it grows in such abundance after the forest fires which occur throughout the hot summer months. Lakes are vast, surrounded by mountains and so undisturbed by people you can pull up by a river at the roadside and sleep peacefully all night.

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Dawson City
Gold rush history
Ghost towns and ruins of the gold rush era of the past are left intact in the wooden shacks that were once people’s homes; you will find tins of unopened food left on the shelves, as well as cars which have been left to rust over decades. Visit Dawson City and be met with full gold rush period costumes and buildings preserved in the style of the time.

With a population of just over 33,000 it is easy to escape the busy tourist traps and take your trip at a slow pace; while still soaking up culture, history and nature. Make sure to add the Yukon to your Canadian road trip bucket list.

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How to stay ‘Bear Aware’

BearWhilst on your travels in North America you may be lucky enough to encounter a bear, if you do see one hopefully it will be from your vehicle or at a distance, but if you run into one on the trails you should be prepared. Carry bear spray in an easily accessible place and know how to use it, follow these tips to stay safe and keep bears wild.

Make noise, especially when walking through areas of brush and trees. Shout or sing as you walk, if a bear hears you coming it will likely leave before you reach it.

If you come across a bear and it is yet to see you, leave the area in the direction you came as quickly and quietly as possible.

If you encounter a black bear at a close range make yourself seem as large as intimidating in possible, if there are a few of you group together wave your poles in the air, speak in a calming appeasing voice and continue facing the bear. Back away from the bear calmly and waving your poles, never turn your back as this can trigger the animal’s predator instinct.

If the bear turns away it may be getting ready to charge at you, this doesn’t mean it wants to fight, it is trying to give a warning that you are invading its territory. If the bear charges at you stand your ground, and deploy the bear spray, shout, throw rocks and act aggressively. If the bear persists you will have to fight, use anything you can; rocks, logs, poles. Shout, stamp your feet and make yourself intimidating.

If a grizzly sow with cubs attacks and makes contact, play dead, get into the foetal position face down with your hands protecting your head and neck. Keep your backpack on as this will add protection, keep your knees wide to prevent the bear from rolling you over. Grizzlies usually attack when they feel threatened, if you are playing dead you are no longer a threat to them and they should leave. You will have to wait in the foetal position until the bear has left the area, be certain the bear has gone before moving and seeking medical attention.

Bears are amazingly intelligent and once they associate humans/ tents/ cars with food they will correlate the two forever. By leaving food around your campground instead of storing it properly you are assisting the bear in it’s demise. National parks usually provide bear proof containers for items or suggest leaving food in a locked car, regulations vary between parks. Don’t leave out any kitchenware or items that contained food and drink as they will still smell interesting to the bears and provoke their curiosity.