Backcountry Rookie

DSC_0591Love staying away from the crowd? Eating noodles? Seeing wildlife? Good. Hiking the back country is for you! Multi day hikes enable you to have an authentic camping experience and see parts of the wilderness most tourists would miss. Before you embark on a backpacking adventure it is advisable to have polished your hiking skills by day hiking; getting used to bear country and the physical exertion. The first back country hike I undertook was a solid 4-day trip in Mount Assiniboine Provincial Park, it was a huge learning curve and an incredible few days. You will meet experienced hikers with all the labels and excellent gear, but you don’t have to feel pressured into buying anything costly, the basics will do. Yes, your backpack will be heavier, but you should give back country a try before you commit to buying better equipment. Here are the corners I cut for so many back-country hikes last year…

The tent was from Canadian Tire, it cost $75 CAD on sale; it wasn’t great and was heavy, but it survived the entire trip. Look on classifieds for bargains or see if any fellow road trippers are looking to sell their gear post trip.

The backpack I hiked with I already used to store clothes in the car, I would take out the clothes and store them in a garbage bag when I needed the backpack for back country.

Hiking Poles are the saviours of your knees while you are out walking, you don’t need to purchase any as you can find a suitable stick on your hike and leave it after for someone else to use.

A sleeping pad at this stage won’t necessarily be for comfort, it is more for a barrier between you and the cold floor. I used an old yoga mat that I had lying around and it did the job.

Sleeping bags do not seem to pack down to small sizes in North America, unless you have a lot of money to spend. My sleeping bag was an MEC branded bag which cost $10 CAD from Value Village, it didn’t come with a bag so I would hike with it wrapped in a garbage bag. There are plenty of second hand sleeping bags out there, make sure you run any purchases through a dryer for 20 minutes to prevent bed bugs.

Rain coats can be found in thrift stores, along with waterproof trousers if you wanted to protect your legs.

Follow my back-country food guide for ideas of lightweight meals on the go.

A water filter or purification tablets are essential for safety, choose whichever method works best for you.

A small gas cooker shouldn’t set you back more than $20 including the gas, plates, bowls and small enough pans can be found at the dollar store.

The priority when you are packing should be safety and survival so always carry a first aid kit, various means of starting a fire (in a waterproof bag), spare batteries for your torch, a map, knife and sunscreen. Keep warm clothing in a garbage bag to prevent it from getting wet in a survival situation. Extra Clif bars or energy gels will be wholly appreciated in emergency situations along with a space blanket. Remember to keep these essentials in your bag for day hikes, as well as an emergency shelter and water purifier.

 

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